Does Health 2.0 = Patient-Centered Service?

Peter Jones Design for Care

The 2.0 technology trends of new media, enhanced web applications, data-driven apps, and social media have advanced the sophistication and interaction of applications in most consumer domains.  And co-occurring with this trend, the last three years have been filled with pronouncements of revolutionary changes in healthcare and personal health management envisioned by democratizing health information and enabling communications among people with very specific shared health concerns. Both technology innovations and consumer healthcare resources are included in the Health 2.0 arena. An exemplary Health 2.0 trend is that of health seeking communities. Several early and progressive health community sites have taken hold (Patients Like Me, CureTogether) with adoption from people in various health “communities of concern.” There are numerous specialized disease and patient community sites in every niche and using every wiki and social service. While these are not intended to replace patient communication with health professionals, they serve complementary purposes, enabling conversations between people with similar concerns and questions.  I don’t think we can say how these developments will impact healthcare practice innovation in 3-5 years, because but for now …

First Person Design for Healthcare Innovation

Peter Jones Wu Wei

As I’ve continued to develop material for the Design for Care project, I’m struck by the difference between design for practice and design for individual health-seeking. In designing for practice, ethnographic research and work domain analysis enable us to understand the range of activities and scope of work performed in professional work.  A rigorous analysis of an activity system enables us to design services and information products that fit the work practice and cultures of use. Professional work is highly  consistent, at least within institutions. As with other high-hazard, complex skilled work, healthcare practice is regulated by law and professional societies. While we can study medical and patient care practices in situ and on paper analysis, we will usually never design in the first person. We, design researchers, are not health professionals. And when we are, as many physicians by training are professional informatics specialists, we must separate our personal interaction needs from those of the designated practice being designed for. Designers must always maintain a cognitive on-guard system to ensure we don’t “go native” and believe we have the …

iPad & Next-Gen Tablets: A Clinical Viewpoint

Peter Jones Innovation, Wu Wei

Simple shifts in user interface technology and interaction style can make a huge difference in long term for IT, web applications, and software design. The GUI has been in constant use in consumer software since the 1980’s Mac, with early 90’s Windows 3.0 mainstreaming the GUI. While numerous interaction designers have foretold the death of the GUI, they really haven’t had much to replace it with. A decade ago it was voice, which I never bothered to even respond to. Voice will always have limitations, as it places too heavy a cognitive burden of vocal precision and thinking on the human speaker. We would have to transform our literate, objectified culture to an interpretive, oral culture to use voice UIs effectively. The GUI as we know it took a decade to research, another to establish, and another to mainstream. The gestural touch UIs will probably last as long. Why is this important for healthcare interaction design? First, we might recognize that design technology does not drive adoption. If we innovate a better device or interface than the status quo, usability …

A Chat with Our Professor of Health Design

Peter Jones Wu Wei

Appearing on the DiabetesMine community site, I’ve been asked to participate as a juror on their diabetes innovation contest. Here’s why: Peter Jones may have a common name, but he’s a rare animal. He’s one of the few academic design experts focusing specifically on the user experience in healthcare. And we are delighted to welcome him this year as one of our expert judges for the 2010 DiabetesMine Design Challenge! FYI, Peter has a PhD in Design and Innovation Management, and publishes research in organizational behavior, strategic innovation, and human information interaction as a visiting scholar at the Laboratory for Collaborative Diagnostics at The University of Toronto. He also runs his own consultancy, Redesign Research, and is currently writing a book. Today, his perspectives on how improved design can help change healthcare for the better: DBMine) Peter, you run an online community called Design for Care and are writing a book about “enhancing the human experience of health” through design. Why is all this necessary? What would you say has been missing that we’re looking for? PJ) Design for Care …