Does Health 2.0 = Patient-Centered Service?

Peter Jones Design for Care

The 2.0 technology trends of new media, enhanced web applications, data-driven apps, and social media have advanced the sophistication and interaction of applications in most consumer domains.  And co-occurring with this trend, the last three years have been filled with pronouncements of revolutionary changes in healthcare and personal health management envisioned by democratizing health information and enabling communications among people with very specific shared health concerns. Both technology innovations and consumer healthcare resources are included in the Health 2.0 arena. An exemplary Health 2.0 trend is that of health seeking communities. Several early and progressive health community sites have taken hold (Patients Like Me, CureTogether) with adoption from people in various health “communities of concern.” There are numerous specialized disease and patient community sites in every niche and using every wiki and social service. While these are not intended to replace patient communication with health professionals, they serve complementary purposes, enabling conversations between people with similar concerns and questions.  I don’t think we can say how these developments will impact healthcare practice innovation in 3-5 years, because but for now …

First Person Design for Healthcare Innovation

Peter Jones Wu Wei

As I’ve continued to develop material for the Design for Care project, I’m struck by the difference between design for practice and design for individual health-seeking. In designing for practice, ethnographic research and work domain analysis enable us to understand the range of activities and scope of work performed in professional work.  A rigorous analysis of an activity system enables us to design services and information products that fit the work practice and cultures of use. Professional work is highly  consistent, at least within institutions. As with other high-hazard, complex skilled work, healthcare practice is regulated by law and professional societies. While we can study medical and patient care practices in situ and on paper analysis, we will usually never design in the first person. We, design researchers, are not health professionals. And when we are, as many physicians by training are professional informatics specialists, we must separate our personal interaction needs from those of the designated practice being designed for. Designers must always maintain a cognitive on-guard system to ensure we don’t “go native” and believe we have the …