Bounce Beyond: Call for Next Economy Initiatives

Peter Jones Ecological economics, Social Systems Design

The mission of Bounce Beyond is to accelerate initiatives working to make regenerative, life-centered economies realizable at scale through examples of “next economies” communities. We call these Collaborating Next Economies Communities in Transformation (CoNECTs). Bounce Beyond is an action and learning community of CoNECTs and people with deep transformations experience. We currently sponsor and support four CoNECTs. Through June 15 we have decided to hold an open call to identify and potentially select six more Next Economy initiatives for the Bounce Beynd funding and transformation portfolio, that would include: Bioregional localization programs (e.g.Regenerate Costa Rica) New ecological economic plans (e.g. Doughnut Economy projects) Industry groups (such as seafood) or sectors (such as healthcare) planning for real systems change Large-scale SDG initiatives, at the national or regional level Our mission is to demonstrate the potential to make life-centered economies realizable at scale through exemplars of “next economies” communities. Believing that the conventional economy is a key driver of the crises we are now facing and that responding to people’s pressing need for livelihoods in ways that address the crises is critical, …

Our Theories of Theories of Change: The Social Construction of Transformation

Peter Jones Governance, Social Systems Design, Systemic Design, Transformation Design

Theories of Change (ToC) are well-known in changemaking initiatives and program evaluation as structural models that represent the expected enactment of proposed change programs. They are logic models that portray proof of process that present the sequences of action and the desired outcomes to justify systems change programs. With a research collaborator Ryan Murphy (PhD student, OCAD SFI alum) we have been tracing an emerging research agenda this year to explore the systems theory basis for theories of change. We are starting with critiques of the formalist logic models used in change programs to define claims of social causality from proposed action plans and aim to design systemic approaches to improve visual narration, systems logics, and reliability. See: Murphy, R. & Jones, P. (2020). Systemic Strategy: Systemic Design Methods for Complex Systems Change. RSD9 Symposium, NID Ahmedabad, India. Murphy, R. and Jones, P. (2020). Design management for wicked problems: Towards systemic theories of change through systemic design. Academic Design Management Conference, Toronto, 5-6 August, 2020. Also of course see the work proceeding from the “other Toronto school,” the research agenda …

Systemic Design: Theory, Methods & Practice

Peter Jones Social Systems Design, Systemic Design

Taking Stock and Flow of Systemic Design The book is the latest edition in the Springer Translational Systems Sciences series, and its intention is to develop research-based applications of systems theory and methods to complex design contexts. Systemic design has emerged to address this interdisciplinary area of research and practice, growing from leadership within design studies and its intersection with system sciences. The nine chapters published in this collection were developed by authors from the proceedings of RSD4, the fourth Relating Systems Thinking and Design (RSD) Symposium. The Big Fields of (capital) Design and Systems both deal with approaches to general purpose problem-solving, with domain-independent methodologies based on design rationale or scientific principles for holistic problem solving. As “thinking” modes, both design thinking and systems thinking promise cross-disciplinary resolution of complex problems. Systemic design embraces these traditions, so as not to lose the value of timeless knowledge, but also challenges the growth-as-progress problem drivers of our modernist technological era. These challenges are not at all new. The systems science origins of systemic design can be traced to the influential operations …

Discovery Sampling for Requisite Social Variety

Peter Jones Dialogic Design, Governance, Social Systems Design

Stakeholder selection may be the most critical step in the design of fair and inclusive dialogues that reflect a community’s contributions and perspectives. This is a classic social systems problem that we resolve through a stakeholder identification and recruiting process that, in Dialogic Design, is called Evolutionary Stakeholder Discovery. Over the last decade we have been instrumenting, through careful definition of criteria and observation, how stakeholder discovery can be conducted to identify and recruit optimal participants from a theoretical population sample. As a documented case, in 2012 the Strategic Innovation Lab convened a Dialogic Design Co-Laboratory as a multi-stakeholder panel for the SSHRC Imagining Canada’s Future initiative, as one of the six regional cross-Canadian panels. With only 20 stakeholders, we aimed to represent Southern Ontario for the question of future impacts of urbanism in the region for a 20 year horizon. For this project we selected participants by an evolutionary sampling from a matrix mapping the following characteristics: STEEP/CI (Foresight categories): Social, Technological, Ecological, Economic, Political, Cultural/Intellectual Christakis Five I’s: Intelligence, Impact, Implementation, Interest, and Involvement Sector: Public, Academic, Private/commercial, …