Rethinking Design / Systems / Thinking

Peter Jones Design Management, Sensemaking, Systemic Design

The design community is once again rethinking all the thinkings. It’s about time, as we’ve been through more than a decade after the last global crash and we are now at the start of the next, much longer crash, or the Long Crisis of the Anthropocene. This crash will be political, cultural and financial (unlike the 2008 Minsky Moment (credit implosion) based on the corrupt underpinnings of mortgage-backed securities). Will the design community and design education be prepared this time? Or will we be arguing about ideology and single-cause design activism? Perhaps the compelling ideas of the prior decade are fuzzy by now, but we were busy bringing new design-led interdisciplines into schools and defying the complaints of those that insisted “design education must change.” It was changing – and now we’ve seen several hundred graduates from the OCAD University Strategic Foresight & Innovation MDes. We saw the rise and fall of Transformation Design that attended the hopeful resurgence of new design thinking. At the time, by 2010 at the latest, we were already arguing Design Thinking (the corporate training …

Foresight Playback: Cyclic Models in Foresight Research

Peter Jones Cultural innovation, Innovation, Strategic Foresight

In a series of posts here, I’m continuing to discuss our Strategic Foresight & Innovation research after student graduation. Neal Halvorsen completed his MRP Foresight Playback (Mapping the Future of Industrial Regions by Learning from Historical Cycles of Innovation) after conducting field research in my hometown of Dayton, Ohio. Dayton is almost 500 miles south of Toronto, following the 401 to I-75 South to  Detroit, Toledo, Lima, and then Dayton (a string of cities connected on I-75 to the auto industry). Neal’s MRP on learning from historical cycles of innovation is at: Notably he draws on the mix of cyclic anticipatory models “Kondratieff, Schumpeter, Elliot waves and the Fourth Turning generational cycles are brought together to show how cycles of innovation and decline can be mapped over long periods, adding to the insights that other foresight methodologies can bring to cluster planning.” Uniquely. He integrates these to synthesize their complementary relationships over time, to examine historical patterns into contemporary era, and to suggest this model as a long-horizon planning system for innovation cluster foresight, strategic formation, and investment. Neal’s Medium …

Navigating the Complexity of Cancer Diagnosis

Peter Jones Co-Creation, Design for Care, Systemic Design

A team from OCAD University’s Health Design Studio [1] designed a series of synthesis maps for the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer, for a project to proposes systemic responses to the clinical and social complexity of cancer pre-diagnosis in Canadian care provision. In the two synthesis maps presented here, we represented clinical diagnostic processes and the patient experiences associated with navigating the complexity of cancer diagnosis for three cancer sites, across three (representing 6) geographical regions. The maps were constructed in an iterative design and research process by the HDS as part of a larger CPAC collaboration to identify evidence-based opportunities for system-level change in cancer diagnosis to improve patient experience and clinical practices. The maps present an integration of current knowledge from clinical practice and patient experiences drawn directly from interviews and workshops with patient advisors, primary care physicians and cancer specialists. Two Maps Tell the Story The clinical process map, A Clinical System Perspective of Pan-Canadian Cancer Diagnosis, represents the complex steps of current pre-diagnosis practices for patients living within three geographic regions. Three cancer sites were chosen to …

Systems Change for New(s) Media

Peter Jones Civil media, Media Ecology, Systemic Design

(First posted on Medium) We have credible understanding to suggest that news media, and the journalism supposedly informing the news, no longer contributes to a meaningful shared public reality. With the arrest of Julian Assange, and Big Media’s denouncement of him as a publisher/journalist and as a person, society suffers another major blow from officialdom in the ongoing struggle to locate responsibility in public reporting. Assange built Wikileaks into a self-organizing publishing system, the newsroom of the future. If Western media actually cared about access to truth via “certified authentic documents” there might be less distrust of the content, process, and intentions of news organizations. But instead, when the Guardian (of all outlets) and New York Times actually cheer on the framing and takedown of an influential independent publisher, who has arguably put his life on the line, it serves the function of a political gang hit on a rival content producer. Albeit, a producer whose work embarrasses the state-conformity of the mainstream newsies. I mean, the Guardian wants you to believe he’s culpable for rape — when there is …