Making Sense of Sensemaking

Peter Jones Sensemaking, Wu Wei

Dr. Brenda Dervin presented a lecture and workshop at University of Toronto’s KMDI, kicking off the Making Sense Of series led by professor Peter Pennefather, KMDI outreach director. Peter and I hosted Brenda as befitting this first session in a series of workshops on “how we make sense” in several different domains. What’s new is the focus on new forms of media for aiding sensemaking. Brenda is Professor of Communications at OSU and one of the founding thinkers of sense-making, along with Karl Weick. Their 1980’s work developed theory and cases for how people individually (Dervin) and organizationally (Weick) make explanatory sense of situations in everyday life and breakdowns. Newer contributors to the sensemaking literature Gary Klein, Dave Snowden, and the PARC (now Google) team of Russell, Stefik, Car, Pirolli have contributed versions that extend their prior work in cognitive science. In Dervin’s lecture she explicated each contributor to the canon from the perspective of her recent publication in the Encyclopedia of Library and Information Sciences. While there are other authors contributing to the discourse, Dervin finds these are the …

Making Sense of Sensemaking with Dr. Brenda Dervin

Peter Jones Dialogic Design, Sensemaking, Wu Wei

Sense-making in Collaborative Practice: Can Media Design Support Sensemaking in Professional Practice Collaboration and Decision Making? This conversational workshop is designed as a “dialogue” between a panel of 5 question-askers and Dr. Brenda Dervin. The framing for the conversation has been developed by the panelists. Through a series of questions and answers, Dr. Dervin will attempt to build a bridge between her approach to Sense?Making Methodology and the different approaches to sense-making/sensemaking that ground the panelists’ questions. We envision a two-hour workshop-conversation inviting researchers and practitioners working in problems information seeking, interprofessional practice development, and other joint decision making challenges. Why has sense?making/sensemaking recently emerged as a lens through which we describe human experience with information, decision making, and complexity? Haven’t people always tried to “make sense?” If so, what have we learned from our attempts to describe the phenomenon of sensemaking in research and practice? Multiple disciplines have recognized a need to describe the human experience of coping, struggling with, working around, and making decisions in situations where complexity reigns. The lessons learned from such experiences are not simple …

iPad & Next-Gen Tablets: A Clinical Viewpoint

Peter Jones Innovation, Wu Wei

Simple shifts in user interface technology and interaction style can make a huge difference in long term for IT, web applications, and software design. The GUI has been in constant use in consumer software since the 1980’s Mac, with early 90’s Windows 3.0 mainstreaming the GUI. While numerous interaction designers have foretold the death of the GUI, they really haven’t had much to replace it with. A decade ago it was voice, which I never bothered to even respond to. Voice will always have limitations, as it places too heavy a cognitive burden of vocal precision and thinking on the human speaker. We would have to transform our literate, objectified culture to an interpretive, oral culture to use voice UIs effectively. The GUI as we know it took a decade to research, another to establish, and another to mainstream. The gestural touch UIs will probably last as long. Why is this important for healthcare interaction design? First, we might recognize that design technology does not drive adoption. If we innovate a better device or interface than the status quo, usability …

A Chat with Our Professor of Health Design

Peter Jones Wu Wei

Appearing on the DiabetesMine community site, I’ve been asked to participate as a juror on their diabetes innovation contest. Here’s why: Peter Jones may have a common name, but he’s a rare animal. He’s one of the few academic design experts focusing specifically on the user experience in healthcare. And we are delighted to welcome him this year as one of our expert judges for the 2010 DiabetesMine Design Challenge! FYI, Peter has a PhD in Design and Innovation Management, and publishes research in organizational behavior, strategic innovation, and human information interaction as a visiting scholar at the Laboratory for Collaborative Diagnostics at The University of Toronto. He also runs his own consultancy, Redesign Research, and is currently writing a book. Today, his perspectives on how improved design can help change healthcare for the better: DBMine) Peter, you run an online community called Design for Care and are writing a book about “enhancing the human experience of health” through design. Why is all this necessary? What would you say has been missing that we’re looking for? PJ) Design for Care …