Robots & executive bonuses may have (already) taken your job

Peter Jones Social Systems Design, Strategic Foresight

From AP and reposted everywhere:  Recession and technology killing off middle-class jobs Entire employment categories are beginning to disappear faster than labor economists had believed as computer software, robots and other devices become more sophisticated and powerful — and millions of more jobs will follow suit  Five years after the start of the Great Recession, the toll is terrifyingly clear: Millions of middle-class jobs have been lost in developed countries the world over.The situation is even worse than it appears. Most of the jobs will never return, and millions more are likely to vanish as well, say experts who study the labor market. What’s more, these jobs aren’t just being lost to China and other developing countries and they aren’t just factory work. Increasingly, jobs are disappearing in the service sector, home to two-thirds of all workers. They are being obliterated by technology. Year after year, the software that runs computers and an array of other machines and devices becomes more sophisticated and powerful, and capable of doing more efficiently tasks that humans have always done. For decades, science fiction …

Designing for Healthy Communities

Peter Jones Design for Care, Social Systems Design

Futures of Healthcare Service Innovation I’m at the Medlove 2012 event in Berlin, next week Friday Nov 23 – for a day of conference presentations and design concepts in healthcare UX and service design. A practitioner’s conference, Medlove is organized as one of the series of European design and UX meetings.  Design for Care is in editing and not yet on the shelves, so I’ll be presenting a central idea of the book: Our personal health is only as good as the resilience and care in our communities. Healthy future living depends on our co-creating beneficent conditions for well-being.  Traditional and complementary healthcare practices are intimately a part of the new community model. Health 2.0 has been captured by the imagination of Health IT, H2.0 startups, app builders. However, there’s a real world limit to the impact of any IT. The Internet will not help you if you’re actually sick or depressed. People in your actual social worlds have the ability to touch and express care. People and their shares inside software apps have a quite limited range really. Current …

ISSS 2012: Systemic Design Languages

Peter Jones Social Systems Design, Systemic Design

I recently returned from San Jose where I participated in a deeply engaging ISSS 2012, the annual meeting of the International Society for the Systems Sciences organized by outgoing president (and Toronto colleague) David Ing to great effect. Although ISSS is the legacy of the original Society for General Systems Research, it must be credited for moving beyond the conventional scholarly conference formula while keeping its learned society credibility. They continue to adapt to the purposes of effective systems research, deepening learning and practice, and having societal influence. At ISSS, publishing and talks extend the foundation of systems theory and share new applications. The purpose of presenting is more community development, not for credentialing a reference. I presented a short paper and a “Systems Basics” lecture. The short paper was quickly written to capture and share our learning from this year’s Systemic Design course which I teach in OCADU’s Strategic Foresight and Innovation MDes program. Professor Jeremy Bowes, who teaches the Understanding Systems course in our two-part course block, collaborated on the presentation. Toward the Integration of Visual Languages for …

Same As It Ever Was

Peter Jones Dialogic Design, Social Systems Design, Strategic Foresight

We have been in the same global mega-crisis for 50 years now. Two proposals were presented to the Club of Rome in 1969. The board selected the System Dynamics modeling project supported by Jay Forrester’s World Model, with the results published by Meadows, Meadows and Randers in 1972 as The Limits to Growth. The Club of Rome convened March 1 at Smithsonian’s sponsorship for a global symposium and revisited the Limits to Growth. Dennis Meadows spoke and was interviewed by Smithsonian, where he claims we missed our chance to repair the foreseeable: Is it Too Late for Sustainable Development?  When the Club of Rome selected the systemic modeling approach, it perhaps unknowingly placed a strong bet on a technological view of ecological and social systems. There was at the time an optimistic social belief that society would do the right thing, if presented with a sound scientific case. After all, president Nixon supported Earth Day and Americans still generally believed science and education were good forces in society, and not just an organized hippie plot to change suburban lifestyles. However, …