Healthcare Service Design: Co-creating better healthcare experiences

Peter Jones Design for Care, Design for Practice, Service Design

As Design for Care launched in early June, O’Reilly Media kindly coordinated the second webcast on healthcare service design as an integrated practice of empathic design, to a live audience of about 500.  The post-webcast video is now online and at your regular YouTube stations: The webinar maps design practices and methods found effective in the most critical contexts in healthcare (consumer, clinical, institutional), illustrated by current cases and design research. Brief design research studies are presented to prompt rethinking of the meanings of care, of information sensemaking at point of care, and the design competencies sufficient to healthcare’s complexity. As designers start to make inroads in the practices of clinical healthcare, they are finding institutions have little context to employ their contributions. In my book research I found very few clinics employing design professionals,  unless you count the website staff. Yes, academic researchers and some academic design professionals are involved in funded multidisciplinary research, and then they tend to leave the institution and publish research. Designers and design researchers are not involved in the practical programs of integrating information, …

If disruption is too slow to notice, is it still innovation?

Peter Jones Design for Care, Design for Practice, Service Design

Slownovation in Healthcare? Atul Gawande travels back in time through the lens of the history to uncover biases in sociotechnical practices and finds an archetypal problem: Fixation on technology, while ignoring the simple field fix.  He compares two medical practice innovations from over 150 years ago, in the recent New Yorker article Slow Ideas. The invention of general anesthesia allowed doctors to spend enough time working on a patient to actually get the job done. Modern surgery was impossible without it. But nearly coinciding with this invention was the discovery of antiseptic (and thereby sterile technique) by Joseph Lister. Using carbolic acid to clean hands and instruments saved patients the horrible death by infection following a reasonably successful surgery in the late 1800’s.  Dr. Gawande asks “why did it take so long for antiseptic practice to diffuse into practice?” Its a good question. Read it. Then solve the puzzle for yourself of innovation’s diffusion. I thank Anne Aretz (on her Tumblr Shouts and Mumbles) for bringing this article to my attention on Twitter. (Even though I follow Atul on Twitter, …

Design for Care | Opening Book Day

Peter Jones Design for Care, Service Design

As promised, my book Design for Care is in print and available at Rosenfeld Media and Amazon, with some of the early testimonials. So many engaged designers and healthcare innovators have contributed to the book, so on its launch I’m becoming aware of the relationships and communities standing behind me as the book and their work in the book goes forward. The project’s lead designer, James Caldwell of 418QE, established the themes and design language, within the new Rosenfeld Media book design schema developed just in time for our release. Rosenfeld Media is a perfect publisher for this emerging field of healthcare design. They design and produce a beautiful and crisply readable paperback (356 pages and just 2/3 inch thick!). They provide buyers a choice of print AND 3 e-versions, or e-versions only. And they post all the images produced on Flickr with license to borrow and attribute. One of the first things we’re doing is changing over the Design for Care book community (the Ning site) to Care Design Network, a practitioner hub for designers, healthcare professionals, innovation and service consultants, …

Design for Care – Clinical Design Competencies for Care Organizations

Peter Jones Design for Care, Service Design

Design for Care: Future of Healthcare Service Innovation Friday I present a new discussion of my upcoming Rosenfeld Media book Design for Care on the Healthcare Innovation by Design Pioneers webinar series, sponsored by Dr. Sam Basta. The focus of the webinar is service design in healthcare as a practice of empathic care, and the practices and methods of Clinical Design. Context: Designing for care complements clinical care practice, improving services and creating innovative responses to complex human problems. Designers are finally starting to make inroads in the world of clinical healthcare, but are finding traditional institutions have not created a context for their contribution. Design for Care explores design practices and methods across the spectrum of healthcare (e.g., consumer, clinical, institutional system), based on the lifecycle of patients and how they navigate care services. Design for Care inspires cross-sectoral systemic design by introducing methods and practices found effective in different healthcare contexts, illustrated by current cases and design research. Case studies and methods will be presented in the context of patient information seeking and clinical information use.