Announcing RSD5, Relating Systems Thinking to Design 5

Peter Jones Service Design, Social Systems Design, Strategic Innovation, Systemic Design

RSD5  Systemic Design for Social Complexity Relating Systems Thinking and Design 5 Symposium OCAD University      Toronto, Canada      October 13-15, 2016 The RSD series has advanced an agenda for exploring a strong integration between systems thinking and design to take on the most important challenges facing our planet today. RSD4 held in Banff, Canada September 2015 brought together nearly 200 people together from around the world to explore new dimensions in design-led systems design, transformation and research.  The keynote videos are now available, and the full proceedings are published online. Join us in the vibrant metropolis of Toronto, October 2016 for the fifth symposium hosted at OCAD University  to accelerate a convergence of design, social, and technology fields toward co-creating humanized (eco)systems. The theme of Systemic Design for Social Complexity represents our continuing focus on advanced systemic and service design for contemporary and futures-oriented societal concerns. All social systems become complex over time, developing resilience, and increasing resistance to structural change. Systemic design challenges typically face multiple dilemmas in defining successful outcomes and orientations to change. Systemic design approaches negotiate the dilemma of emergence …

Edge Practices: How Do You Measure Value?

Peter Jones Design for Practice, Service Design, Social Systems Design, Strategic Innovation

Every design discipline (even industrial design) has had to develop its best rationale for the question “why should we keep/hire/use you guys?” If they keep asking, “what is it you do again?” you may have more work to do more on strategic communication. Emerging practices will always be considered marginal at first, within an organization. Practices (not processes) are formed from collective agreement, and are often tacitly formed.  When an organization first develops a core process, such as project management, it starts as a practice. Outcomes are uncertain, its value to cost is assessed. When a practice, such as user experience, becomes vital to every project, it becomes formalized as a process. You can tell practices because they have small in-groups, communities of practice that may form to develop methods, ensure quality, share learning, as in nearly all user experience groups in the past.  (I can speak as having been the “first one” and developed UX capacity in several organizations). This agreement of practice requires enrollment of participants over a period of time. You don’t “pitch” your own organization to …

Relating Systems Thinking & Design 3

Peter Jones Service Design, Social Systems Design, Systemic Design

RSD3 2014 Symposium Following the successful Relating Systems Thinking & Design (RSD2 symposium) last year, RSD3 seeks to engage a wider audience, maintaining the lightweight style of a small symposium where every participant can easily meet. Registration is open for RSD3 – taking place again at the Oslo School of Architecture and Design, October 15-17. Since last year the organizing committee has co-created an international team to develop collaborative research and curricula, as the Systemic Design Network.  We are convinced that integrated, more effective systems thinking and methods are required for addressing complex societal concerns – and our observation is that educational programs and design agencies are not providing the skills and knowledge necessary to deal with systemic design issues. We believe a stronger integration with design and design thinking is a promising way forward. Last year’s symposium geared up the expectations and increased the enthusiasm. This year’s presenters are sharing significant progress, constructive projects and research that demonstrates or leads deeper impact on society in domains of social conflict and democracy, new economies, healthcare and community well-being, education and …

Managing Healthcare Innovation as a Design Process

Peter Jones Design for Care, Service Design, Strategic Innovation

Based on a talk for the Southern Ohio branch of the Project Management Institute (Healthcare group). Many thanks to PMI for their sponsorship. Healthcare innovation has been led by technology providers, almost entirely, over the period we consider relevant to “innovation” (1970’s – current). Innovation has been a supply-side approach, led by information technology (EMRs and Health IT platforms) and medical devices (ranging from user-controllable diffusion pumps to CAT machines). Only recently have clinical services become the focus of innovation, ranging from patient-centered care to new practice models (the ACO and PCMH) and business models. Yet even service innovations emerge from the supply side – just supply-side from inside the hospital instead of industry vendors. The hospital remains a highly hierarchical entity, managed as a top-down coordination of patient bodies in space and time. The patient’s individual desires and personal circles of care are not elicited for service innovation – they are surveyed for “patient satisfaction” with these service improvements.  That’s a huge difference. Internal innovation programs typically develop service proposals as process improvements, from a quality management perspective, and …