Healthcare Experience Design: 4.11.11

Peter Jones Design for Care, Innovation, Service Design

The first Healthcare Experience Design conference, a one-day symposium held in Boston April 11, sold out with nearly 300 participants across all sectors and industries.  The program selected leading speakers and designers in four tracks of presentations: Patient-Centric Design Designing for Care: Provider Interfaces and Care Environments Facilitating Engagement New Models for Healthcare Delivery Keynote speaker was BJ Fogg of Stanford’s Persuasive Technology Lab, with a physically interactive talk on designing for persuasion that required managing latex gloves, floss, and instructions prepared for hundreds of sealed envelopes. Because things were organized in tracks, I was speaking in “Designing for Care” and missed Matthew Diamanti’s talk on People are the Product in the Patient-Centered Care track. I’m waiting for the videos to become available (soon) so we can see watch those presentations at leisure. The symposium brought together designers and leaders across a wide range of healthcare sectors.  There is something new and inaugural about this meeting, like attending CHI for the first time in its early years.  This is just the start of something, big, as designers, researchers and institutions …

Synergetics: Buckminster Fuller Revival

Peter Jones Dialogic Design, Innovation, Transformation Design

Southern Illinois University Carbondale recently held the Synergetics conference, a symposium revival of Buckminster Fuller’s work, faculty, and former students at his last major home institution. Invited speakers included former Design students and faculty Bill Lunderman (Colgate) and Larry Busch. Invited speakers included me, Jennifer Rice (Fruitful Strategy),  and Steelcase’s Melissa DeSota.  Keynote was Thomas Zung, Fuller’s architect collaborator and archivist. This year they are also saving domes and putting a large one up at his former residence, and recovering his legacies. placing our current sustainability thinking in line with his lifelong dream of a world that works for everyone. A slide in my talk  Collaborating for Complexity credits Fuller as the first philosopher of Thrivability, the reach beyond sustainability that we strive for in socially systemic innovation. Collaborating for Complexity: SIUC Synergetics View more presentations from Peter Jones In Critical Path Fuller said: “The success of all humanity can be accomplished only by a terrestrially comprehensive, technologically competent, design revolution. This revolution must develop artifacts where energy-use efficiency not only occasions the artifacts’ spontaneous adoption by humanity, but also …

OCADU wins the Rotman Design Challenge

Peter Jones Innovation, Service Design, Slow Learning, Social Innovation, Strategic Foresight

Congratulations to the OCADU team for winning the Rotman Design Challenge! The team from our first year OCAD University graduate program MDes in Strategic Foresight and Innovation won the Rotman Design Challenge on Saturday, for a high-touch (not high-tech) proposal for Mayo Clinic for early disease prevention, Mayo Moms. Mayo Moms leveraged a known health issue (lack of breast feeding culture in US) with a well-framed solution (human-to-human network sponsored by Mayo) with a sophisticated research approach and simple yet spectacular graphical design values. Our school’s team had only two weeks (those starting early had 3 weeks) and they beat 20 entries, with great finalists from U Cincinnati’s DAAP and school of business, Cal College of Arts, Case Western, and of course several great entries from Rotman. The $1500 award and first place went to a 5-person team of: Jen Chow, team captain Martin Ryan Josina Vink Jessica Mills Phouphet Sivaphong Look out for more great work from this program over the year. Toronto , March 7, 2011 – Students from institutions across North America who are recognized for their …

iPad & Next-Gen Tablets: A Clinical Viewpoint

Peter Jones Innovation, Wu Wei

Simple shifts in user interface technology and interaction style can make a huge difference in long term for IT, web applications, and software design. The GUI has been in constant use in consumer software since the 1980’s Mac, with early 90’s Windows 3.0 mainstreaming the GUI. While numerous interaction designers have foretold the death of the GUI, they really haven’t had much to replace it with. A decade ago it was voice, which I never bothered to even respond to. Voice will always have limitations, as it places too heavy a cognitive burden of vocal precision and thinking on the human speaker. We would have to transform our literate, objectified culture to an interpretive, oral culture to use voice UIs effectively. The GUI as we know it took a decade to research, another to establish, and another to mainstream. The gestural touch UIs will probably last as long. Why is this important for healthcare interaction design? First, we might recognize that design technology does not drive adoption. If we innovate a better device or interface than the status quo, usability …