Co-designing for power balance in social systems

Peter Jones Design for Practice, Dialogic Design, Social Systems Design, Transformation Design

Power remains a hugely unresolved issue in strategic design, “systems change,” OD, and progressive management. Healthcare, like other public and social sector institutions (education, social welfare, government) is organized by what Jane Jacobs in Systems of Survival calls Guardian systems, the moral syndrome of ruling.  As in government, the values of authority, prowess, rank, restraints on trading, and “deceit for the task” are important in these sectors, though we don’t like to admit it. Even democratic governments are not democratic in values or style, they inherit the mantle of the warrior class, which makes a living by “taking”. In some ways, business – even corporate America – is fairer and more open. In Jacobs’ model, business (or merchant systems) tends to care about collaboration, honesty, results and of course customers – this leads to power toward winning joint ends and achievement, rather than winning process (or means) struggles. Power manifests in many ways – so in design processes, we adapt and deal with power issues in different ways, according to different environments.  Design practices tend to deal with power differentials …

The Healthcare Innovator’s Challenge

Peter Jones Design for Care, Design for Practice, Strategic Innovation

Adapted from Design for Care (page 253 ) The innovator’s challenge in healthcare is not a technological fix – it is more to understand and preserve core values of human care while changing practices for durable social and economic benefit. Although economic value is often a pivotal driver of innovation adoption, cost management is not itself a core value but a sustainability factor to be evaluated in decision making. The related social innovation challenge is a macro policy problem, not a design issue.  An immediate challenge is convincing organizations that accessible patient-centred, value-based care is actually possible with a business model change. (Then new care service models can be designed). It will be the rare organization with the cost buffers and patience that reconfigures care models in advance of a new business model.                                 Using a simple Business Model Canvas model, a shared value healthcare business model (based on Porter & Lee’s value-based care) is outlined.  The model suggests a significant trans-valuation of the “offer” …

Design with Dialogue: Framing Perspectives on Mental Wellness

Peter Jones Design for Care, Design for Practice

An Innovation Town Hall on Mental Wellness November’s Design with Dialogue invites a wide range of community members to explore the landscape of campus and community mental wellness, the innovation of responsive care, and enhancing health service. With seasoned facilitators and special guests we take on several big questions, as well as those brought to the dialogue in the DwD circle. How can we move beyond the conventional views of mental health and learn from each other? Are there innovations in community and social health that might enhance awareness and improve mental wellbeing? What might we understand together to cultivate empathy and insight about the experience of emotional and mental health journeys? The Health and Wellness Centre at OCAD University has pursued a positive, innovative course in engaging students and the campus in dialogues to understand experiences in mental health. Partnering with the HWC in this community-focused DwD, we join students, faculty, and community professionals in an exploration into the experience and struggles of mental health and the context of care and health services. The Innovation Town Hall starts with …

Healthcare Service Design: Co-creating better healthcare experiences

Peter Jones Design for Care, Design for Practice, Service Design

As Design for Care launched in early June, O’Reilly Media kindly coordinated the second webcast on healthcare service design as an integrated practice of empathic design, to a live audience of about 500.  The post-webcast video is now online and at your regular YouTube stations: The webinar maps design practices and methods found effective in the most critical contexts in healthcare (consumer, clinical, institutional), illustrated by current cases and design research. Brief design research studies are presented to prompt rethinking of the meanings of care, of information sensemaking at point of care, and the design competencies sufficient to healthcare’s complexity. As designers start to make inroads in the practices of clinical healthcare, they are finding institutions have little context to employ their contributions. In my book research I found very few clinics employing design professionals,  unless you count the website staff. Yes, academic researchers and some academic design professionals are involved in funded multidisciplinary research, and then they tend to leave the institution and publish research. Designers and design researchers are not involved in the practical programs of integrating information, …