Systemic Design for Health Services Innovation

Peter Jones Design for Care, Service Design

Systemic Design for Health Services Innovation Presentation at Frontier of Service Systems Science 2012, Tokyo Institute of Technology, February 23, 2012 Healthcare as an industry faces multiple crises that require systemic solutions, not piecemeal fixes. Systemic design is not “innovation” in the popular sense of creating new IT systems or services.  Systemic design addresses root causes responsible for the perceived crisis state, addressing factors such as healthcare access, availability of primary care, instituonal business models, fragmented information channels, and over-reliance on specialization. Approaches are presented for long-range foresight to align future service design with expected societal requirements as well as local community health needs.  Yet today healthcare services are resistant to systemic  innovation as clinics and hospitals are (necessarily) risk-averse institutions. Service innovation in healthcare must be articulated as a function of the values of care and the needs of all stakeholders and health seekers, and not merely the functions …

The Unintended Consequences of Uncaring Automation

Peter Jones Design for Care, Design for Practice

I’m completing the final sections of the manuscript for the two-year project researching and writing the Rosenfeld Media book Design for Care.   A central theme weaving together the 8 chapters is systemic design, the adoption of a whole system (social cybernetic) approach to the complex design situations in healthcare.  Variations in this thinking range from the medical competency of systems-based practice to the “whole human” perspective recently promoted by the emeritus U London professor BM Hegde. Where we must insist on systemic design is in the design of systems, specifically in the integration of enterprise level IT in clinical practice. One of the more heavy-handed systems problems clinics and healthcare professionals face is the introduction and integration of electronic medical records (EMR) systems. While some of these systems are better than others, they can significantly divert clinical organizations from a patient-centered care model. They are a quite a boon to …

Avoiding Informatics Overload

Peter Jones Design for Care, Information Ecology, Sensemaking

Mark Hurst posts on Good Experience the argument that information overload suppresses comprehension and creates an absence of understanding and retention: To solve info overload, make friends with The Nothing In my experience this is true, and is moreover a testable proposition.  Mark says: Because the only way to really make information disappear, these days, is to surround it by a sufficient amount of competing information. Case in point is Side Effects? These Drugs Have a Few. Here the NYT references a Harvard study showing that there are, on average, 70 side effects listed on drug labels. Some labels contain over 500 side effects. What would be the possible benefit of a drug maker listing over 500 side effects? Easy: it gives coverage in a liability lawsuit. What’s clear is that the patient experience is harmed by these labels. Patients now know less about side effects than they did before. …

Designing for Whole Systems & Services in Healthcare

Peter Jones Design for Care, Design research, Service Design

We’re at CHI 2011 Vancouver, Tuesday May 10 for this Special Interest Group. Please join us if you’re at CHI! Abstract This CHI 2011 SIG provides a workshop for collective problem finding and community identification. The goal is to initiate a working group to coordinate systemic design research issues across practitioner communities. This SIG addresses the insufficiency of user-centered design and informatics research to design for system and service-level innovations in healthcare. The SIG seeks to coordinate communications and participation across design practice, research disciplines, and areas of health practice for service system innovation. About:  The SIG addresses the problem of coordinating and advancing systems design and design research for service-level and systemic innovations in healthcare. Healthcare is a domain characterized by multiple stakeholders (from consumers and patients to clinical staff, from administrators to insurers), multiple services (from primary care to academic institutional networks), and multiple sectors of services (from …