Recent Reviews for Design for Care

Peter Jones Design for Care

Design for Care has apparently been discovered by the larger design community this year, after a year in print!  With the launch in June 2013, I had thought that between Rosenfeld Media and my own decently-connected network we might find numerous reviews in the first few months – but more reviews have emerged so far this year. Of course I’m appreciative, they’re all insightful pieces, and its so heartening to me to find that readers are getting the message. The late reviews trend also indicates that the book may have several cycles of discovery. Some of the more in-depth reviews include: Design Observer – Manuela Aguirre Making the Case for a Design-Led Transformation: Review of Design for Care by Alejo Jumat Redesigning Healthcare – UX Magazine, Alice Preston Amazon Page and Reviews These are primarily reviews within design publications – there are only a few in the healthcare field, and …

Design Thinking’s Convergence Diversion

Peter Jones Design for Care, Design for Practice, Transformation Design

(Updated from 2010) We now tend to think of design thinking as embracing all that represents “new design.”  Yet there remains more value in some of the original views of design thinking from decades ago than in most of what’s presented today. Design thinking is often treated as a process for moving an idea from ideation through prototyping to a concept test or an early alpha design. Or we mean it to represent the creative process associated with the structural mechanics of a generic design process – identify user needs by empathy and observation, iterate a promising prototype, add visual design and some marketing and voila. Let’s go back 30 years. The 4 orders of abstraction Buchanan (1992) describes in Wicked Problems in Design Thinking are usually left untapped in design thinking discussions. Buchanan lists: Symbolic and visual communications Material objects Activities and organized services Complex systems or environments for …

The Healthcare Innovator’s Challenge

Peter Jones Design for Care, Design for Practice, Strategic Innovation

Adapted from Design for Care (page 253 ) The innovator’s challenge in healthcare is not a technological fix – it is more to understand and preserve core values of human care while changing practices for durable social and economic benefit. Although economic value is often a pivotal driver of innovation adoption, cost management is not itself a core value but a sustainability factor to be evaluated in decision making. The related social innovation challenge is a macro policy problem, not a design issue.  An immediate challenge is convincing organizations that accessible patient-centred, value-based care is actually possible with a business model change. (Then new care service models can be designed). It will be the rare organization with the cost buffers and patience that reconfigures care models in advance of a new business model.                                 Using …

Managing Healthcare Innovation as a Design Process

Peter Jones Design for Care, Service Design, Strategic Innovation

Based on a talk for the Southern Ohio branch of the Project Management Institute (Healthcare group). Many thanks to PMI for their sponsorship. Healthcare innovation has been led by technology providers, almost entirely, over the period we consider relevant to “innovation” (1970’s – current). Innovation has been a supply-side approach, led by information technology (EMRs and Health IT platforms) and medical devices (ranging from user-controllable diffusion pumps to CAT machines). Only recently have clinical services become the focus of innovation, ranging from patient-centered care to new practice models (the ACO and PCMH) and business models. Yet even service innovations emerge from the supply side – just supply-side from inside the hospital instead of industry vendors. The hospital remains a highly hierarchical entity, managed as a top-down coordination of patient bodies in space and time. The patient’s individual desires and personal circles of care are not elicited for service innovation – …