Care as Design Practice

Peter Jones Design for Care

Simplifying a complex set of concepts into a central image. We might conceive a core value of caring as ontological, a mode of existence that human-centred practices may share with medicine, nursing, counseling, social work. This way of being might be central to design as service to society, humanity, and direct clients and stakeholders. And we might recognize that every level of structure endorses care differently. The outcomes of care for persons, as practice, as an organization, or the functions of what we believe to be system level are not coordinated by language or method. Whereas the theory of the (20th century) firm was driven by returns on assets and knowledge that required strategic alignment to achieve cycles of returns – perhaps a 21st century model of organizing for ecologies of care might align these levels of structure to a values of care – including financial sustainability – as a form of care coordination. Care as goal and as method becomes a design practice, involving whole persons in systems of related concerns resolved by interactive human-centred systems of engagement and …

What Counts as Evidence in Healthcare Service Design?

Peter Jones Design for Care, Design research, Human-centered design

Evidence-Based Service Design From Chapter5, Design for Care Inpatients spend most of their time during hospital treatment and recovery in a bed, often in a shared room. It might be obvious to anyone who has even visited a hospital room that the experience of resting and waiting in this sterile, artificial environment could be greatly improved. The everyday experience of the inpatient constitutes encounters with the physical environment—from building architecture to room layout and furniture—and the presentation of services within a hospital and specialized clinics. Most of these environments leave a lot to be desired, and designed. What if it could be proven that people heal demonstrably faster and better in beautiful, well cared for physical environments? Architecture professor Roger Ulrich’s research into the direct beneficial health effects of natural and harmonious surroundings during care provides hard evidence to support this theory. Ulrich’s 1983 article “View Through a Window May Influence Recovery from Surgery” was the first scientific recognition of the capacity of nature to accelerate healing in the clinical environment.4 Taking a patient-centric perspective from the outset, Ulrich demonstrated …

MISC Magazine Interview

Peter Jones Design for Care, Media Ecology, Strategic Foresight

Interview with Dr. Peter Jones Thanks to Dustin Johnston-Jewell, Strategic Foresighter at Idea Couture and SFI MDes grad student, for the terrific interview and publication in IC’s MISC magazine. While MISC is Idea Couture’s own curated and published magazine, it has very high design values and a good range of authors, from within the fast-growing Toronto innovation firm and from outside. It extends their thought leadership by putting a printed and online journal on the street where they can curate a huge volume of ideas while scanning and managing trends. I was happy to do the 90 minute interview with Dustin, who edited and wrote much of it for the online MISC (and a shorter version in print if you’re lucky enough to get the exclusive journal). A brief excerpt follows: With the advent of biotechnology, genomics, and human-centric patient care, the healthcare industry is going through an era of rapid change. Both the rate and potency of this change are going to increase as the combined efforts of technological advancement and demographic shift bring about business opportunity for patient …

Recent Reviews for Design for Care

Peter Jones Design for Care

Design for Care has apparently been discovered by the larger design community this year, after a year in print!  With the launch in June 2013, I had thought that between Rosenfeld Media and my own decently-connected network we might find numerous reviews in the first few months – but more reviews have emerged so far this year. Of course I’m appreciative, they’re all insightful pieces, and its so heartening to me to find that readers are getting the message. The late reviews trend also indicates that the book may have several cycles of discovery. Some of the more in-depth reviews include: Design Observer – Manuela Aguirre Making the Case for a Design-Led Transformation: Review of Design for Care by Alejo Jumat Redesigning Healthcare – UX Magazine, Alice Preston Amazon Page and Reviews These are primarily reviews within design publications – there are only a few in the healthcare field, and I hope to see more uptake in the clinical and educational domains. My hope is that the late appreciation of the work suggests that the book was slightly ahead of …