Healthcare Experience Design: 4.11.11

Peter Jones Design for Care, Innovation, Service Design

The first Healthcare Experience Design conference, a one-day symposium held in Boston April 11, sold out with nearly 300 participants across all sectors and industries.  The program selected leading speakers and designers in four tracks of presentations: Patient-Centric Design Designing for Care: Provider Interfaces and Care Environments Facilitating Engagement New Models for Healthcare Delivery Keynote speaker was BJ Fogg of Stanford’s Persuasive Technology Lab, with a physically interactive talk on designing for persuasion that required managing latex gloves, floss, and instructions prepared for hundreds of sealed envelopes. Because things were organized in tracks, I was speaking in “Designing for Care” and missed Matthew Diamanti’s talk on People are the Product in the Patient-Centered Care track. I’m waiting for the videos to become available (soon) so we can see watch those presentations at leisure. The symposium brought together designers and leaders across a wide range of healthcare sectors.  There is something …

Designing Leadership: The Voice of “Experience” in Healthcare

Peter Jones Design for Care, Design for Practice

(This piece is concurrently posted at the first Healthcare Experience Design conference site, where I’ll be speaking April 11.) Patients are not users, and people are not (yet)  patients until under a doctor’s care. Where does the user experience of health actually live? Healthcare is systemic at every level of observation, and traditional user-centered design will tend to under-scope that system’s complexity. As with an emergency physician treating a cardiac arrest, but having to ignore multiple chronic diseases causing the attack, user-centered design is unsuited (by method) to fix what ails the system. Design teams will treat symptoms but fail to resolve root causes of systemic health and care problems. We are faced with a double difficulty – of learning the language of healthcare and medicine and then to intervene. Designers must enlarge their methods toolbox and vocabularies to enable a more powerful range of options in systems and services …

Evidence Based Experience Design

Peter Jones Design for Care, Design for Practice, Service Design

Architecture, interior design and clinical devices have adopted evidence-based design (EBD) and these fields actively contribute to its development through major projects, journal articles, and conferences. Evidence based design is a rigorous design equivalent to the careful application of scholarly evidence in informing care decisions. It is a healthcare term of art and has meaning in that sector.  It is not the gathering of user data as research “evidence” to inform design decisions in digital design.  EBD generally involves: Reviewing current and retrospective research literatures to identify precedents, mature findings, and prescriptive guidance from relevant studies. Prioritizing and balancing the literature basis with primary data collected from actual patient data, subject matter experts, and professional observations. Advancing theories and hypotheses to support observations and structuring evaluations to test outcomes of design decisions (e.g. architecture, facility design, wayfinding, room design). Measuring outcomes following implementation and assessing theory validity and any gap …

What are “Information Needs?” How do we Design for Them?

Peter Jones Design for Care, Information Ecology

Information seeking theories often refer to the concept of information needs, a presumed cognitive state wherein an individual’s need state triggers the search behavior characteristic of information seeking in a given context. While terms such as these have migrated from a common theory to everyday colloquial use, their use in design research should be questioned and evaluated as in any research. There are other lenses to view behavior that focus on motive, goals, activity contexts, but not necessarily “need,” whether information or other personal need. Information need goes back to a definition from Taylor’s (1962!) article “The Process of Asking Questions” which describes four types: The actual, but unexpressed, need for information (the visceral need) The conscious, within-brain description of the need (the conscious need) The formal statement of the question (the formalized need) The question as presented to the information system (the compromised need). Taylor’s points are important because …