First Person Design for Healthcare Innovation

As I’ve continued to develop material for the Design for Care project, I’m struck by the difference between design for practice and design for individual health-seeking. In designing for practice, ethnographic research and work domain analysis enable us to understand the range of activities and scope of work performed in professional work.  A rigorous analysis . . . → Read More: First Person Design for Healthcare Innovation

Who will we be when Design grows up?

The new year often finds blogs and commentators concerned with the memes and themes of the oncoming era hurtling toward us. Participating as I do in the more “abstract” design communities (e.g., experience, anthro, service design, strategic innovation, interaction, information architecture) I observe a lot of unproductive self-definition.  This takes the form of pronouncements about . . . → Read More: Who will we be when Design grows up?

The exquisite artfulness of new business design

I’m holding a physical copy of most the inspiring, wonderfully visual and tactile business book ever written and produced. Because this self-published book was designed, not so much edited, the end result is both visual spectacular and readily understandable.

Business Model Generation, by Alex Osterwalder and Yves Pigneur, and designed by Toronto’s own Alan Smith . . . → Read More: The exquisite artfulness of new business design

Innovating as if your Future Depended on it.

So we’re in an everlasting downturn and nobody is really sure what’s next in store for any industry, newspapers, broadcast, publishing, financial, automotive, retail, construction, food production, energy, healthcare. If the rational, reasonable Western world is in such a fit of uncertainty, we clearly need to be innovating our way forward.

Designers have always been . . . → Read More: Innovating as if your Future Depended on it.