Co-designing for power balance in social systems

Power remains a hugely unresolved issue in strategic design, “systems change,” OD, and progressive management.

Healthcare, like other public and social sector institutions (education, social welfare, government) is organized by what Jane Jacobs in Systems of Survival calls Guardian systems, the moral syndrome of ruling.  As in government, the values of authority, prowess, rank, restraints . . . → Read More: Co-designing for power balance in social systems

Is Online Civil Participation Sufficient to the Institutional Crisis?

My last post left off with “We have experience and world-class methods that reliably achieve consensus in social systems to organize stakeholder commitment. The next missing step then is the courage and ambition to reach through the benign neglect, the cynical stalling, the aligned interests in current economies, and to help stakeholders move forward on . . . → Read More: Is Online Civil Participation Sufficient to the Institutional Crisis?

Future Shock 3.0

(Or is it just in the spirit of Global Future Day, March 1st? Not the best day to have chosen IMO.) Future Shock 1.0 foresaw the 1970’s oil and geo-political shocks, and let’s say 2.0 was pre-millennial fear. Future Shock 3.0 rains down upon our culture – as hopeful optimism. Over-optimism is what they call . . . → Read More: Future Shock 3.0

Contrarian, Spiritual, Strategic Innovation

We often speak of social innovation as if we’re applying the principles of business and product innovation to a social product. However, there are significant differences in how we treat service markets and how we participate in communities where we (and participants) have a democratic stake. They are both social systems, but markets are organized . . . → Read More: Contrarian, Spiritual, Strategic Innovation