Fear and Loathing of Evidence in Design Research

Depending on the discourses you follow, you might notice “design-led everything” has charged ahead with design thinking, speculative and design futures, empathic HCD and so on. Design research and advanced methods have lagged in these discourses. Emerging designers could easily believe that a product/service business case can be supported by small-sample field observations and a keen sense of empathy . . . → Read More: Fear and Loathing of Evidence in Design Research

Edge Practices: How Do You Measure Value?

Every design discipline (even industrial design) has had to develop its best rationale for the question “why should we keep/hire/use you guys?” If they keep asking, “what is it you do again?” you may have more work to do more on strategic communication.

Emerging practices will always be considered marginal at first, within an organization. . . . → Read More: Edge Practices: How Do You Measure Value?

Design Thinking’s Convergence Diversion

(Updated from 2010)

We now tend to think of design thinking as embracing all that represents “new design.”  Yet there remains more value in some of the original views of design thinking from decades ago than in most of what’s presented today. Design thinking is often treated as a process for moving an idea from . . . → Read More: Design Thinking’s Convergence Diversion

Co-designing for power balance in social systems

Power remains a hugely unresolved issue in strategic design, “systems change,” OD, and progressive management.

Healthcare, like other public and social sector institutions (education, social welfare, government) is organized by what Jane Jacobs in Systems of Survival calls Guardian systems, the moral syndrome of ruling.  As in government, the values of authority, prowess, rank, restraints . . . → Read More: Co-designing for power balance in social systems