Designing for Emergence – Monitoring Collective Network Intelligence

Alberto Cottica presents the story of emergence in large, specialized social networks as the social technology necessary to address the wicked complexity of today’s societal problems.

Alberto’s analysis recognizes that citizen level participation could intervene as a powerful social force is guided (even “tweaked” as he says) by monitoring and reinforcing leverage points int . . . → Read More: Designing for Emergence – Monitoring Collective Network Intelligence

A collective failure of moral imagination?

Let’s summarize this week’s headlines with an eye toward the moral hazard now acceptable in every consequential context. The Masters of the Universe have disavowed risk entirely, so, apparently, are we asked to forgive and forget the debts to humanity owed by the amoral 1%.

Lagarde says with respect to Greece “I am not in . . . → Read More: A collective failure of moral imagination?

Wikipedia – The Sound of a Million Monkeys Typing

Britannica finally shut down its print version, and of course pundits blamed Wikipedia. They might have blamed Britannica online, on which you can search for free and read longer pieces. Just like Wikipedia.

We, the Weberati,  have been entranced by the rapid growth and apparent cooperative organization of the free-to-read Wikipedia.  Academics and commentators have . . . → Read More: Wikipedia – The Sound of a Million Monkeys Typing

Is Online Civil Participation Sufficient to the Institutional Crisis?

My last post left off with “We have experience and world-class methods that reliably achieve consensus in social systems to organize stakeholder commitment. The next missing step then is the courage and ambition to reach through the benign neglect, the cynical stalling, the aligned interests in current economies, and to help stakeholders move forward on . . . → Read More: Is Online Civil Participation Sufficient to the Institutional Crisis?