Toronto 2.0 – Becoming a wired participatory polity

Today’s Globe & Mail reports on ChangeCamp.

What is ChangeCamp? It is the application of ‘the long tail’ to public policy. It is a long-held and false assumption that ordinary citizens don’t care about public policy. The statement isn’t, of itself, false. Many, many, many people truly don’t care that much. They want to live . . . → Read More: Toronto 2.0 – Becoming a wired participatory polity

Is Online Civil Participation Sufficient to the Institutional Crisis?

My last post left off with “We have experience and world-class methods that reliably achieve consensus in social systems to organize stakeholder commitment. The next missing step then is the courage and ambition to reach through the benign neglect, the cynical stalling, the aligned interests in current economies, and to help stakeholders move forward on . . . → Read More: Is Online Civil Participation Sufficient to the Institutional Crisis?

Dialogue as unmediated design

Or at least, less-mediated design. A goal and an inherent value of participatory design is that of engaging users directly in a design processes, to minimize the translation of features by designers. The goal of direct participation is not to reduce the cycle time incurred between cycles of user-centered design, prototyping, and user assessment, although . . . → Read More: Dialogue as unmediated design

Tao of Dialogue

Lao Tze imagined a way of serving others and giving up your own ideas:

In caring for others and serving heaven, There is nothing like using restraint. Restraint begins with giving up one’s own ideas. This depends on Virtue gathered in the past. If there is a good store of Virtue, then nothing is impossible. . . . → Read More: Tao of Dialogue